The real world dichotomies for improving the hospital experience

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

A large number of physicians and administrators involved in healthcare right now are working hard on improving the hospital experience and giving our patients a more pleasant time in hospital. As I’ve written about previously, I don’t believe the solutions are necessarily complex or particularly difficult. They rest with basic common sense and humanity. Like

Hospital physicians: Do we miss opportunities to talk about healthy habits and preventive medicine with our patients?

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

As hospital doctors, we are extremely busy people. Our days whizz by, often without a moment to rest or take a deep breath. We are in “the zone” and rightly completely focused on getting our patients better and in a position when they can hopefully leave the hospital. We have chosen a specialty which is

Healthcare information technology: new rules

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Information technology clearly has a long way to go before it delivers on the immense promise of technology to truly improve healthcare. Most of the current solutions—quickly rolled out in response to Meaningful Use requirements—are slow, inefficient and cumbersome. Physicians (and nurses) spend far too much time staring at their screen and navigating the system,

Doctor, do you suffer from Glory Day Syndrome?

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

The practice of medicine is changing faster than anyone can keep pace with. As a hospital physician at a relatively early stage of my career, I’d say that a sizeable number of physicians that I work with are towards the latter end of the spectrum. I find that these doctors, typically over the age of

3 ways nurses can make information technology work better for them

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

The job of a nurse has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. I’ve witnessed these changes at close quarters and heard feedback from nurses in several different hospitals. The biggest change undoubtedly is the interaction with information technology and the move away from paper charting. The theory behind this push, which is part

Replacing the term patient satisfaction with something more meaningful

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

As the patient satisfaction movement races full steam ahead, the time is perfect to regroup and define what this whole thing is really all about. Anyone involved in healthcare, and particularly hospital care, knows that the term “patient satisfaction” has become a buzz phrase recently. Sadly too it’s also evolved into a bit of a

Clocking the miles in the hospital

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

This Sunday I ran the Nantucket Half Marathon. Despite a deluge the day before, the rain managed to hold off on race day and there was a terrific atmosphere all around. Although I’ve been a runner since I was a teenager, this was my first formal run beyond a handful of miles at a time.

Healthcare: The unforgiving online world versus real life

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

It’s funny to think that the internet and the online world, so entrenched in our modern day lives, is still a relatively new phenomenon. When I first started medical school (not really that long ago) we hardly used the internet and the concept of a web search barely existed. It only became widely available on

What’s in a name for the hospital doctor?

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

A while back I wrote about my chosen profession as a hospital doctor and my own personal dislike for the term “hospitalist”. As the number of hospital medicine doctors soars towards the 40,000 mark, what we call ourselves is becoming more important than ever. I felt the need to repost an article from last year,

What would a straightforward referendum on nationalized healthcare look like in America?

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

The recent independence referendum in Scotland got me thinking. I must admit I was glued to the news over the last few days of campaigning. For those of you not following closely, it seemed as if the No camp had a comfortable lead right up until the last week when the opinion polls suddenly showed