Frontline Doc Scripts

Those things patients tell doctors which should never be ignored

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

In the busy world of hospital medicine, where doctors and nurses find themselves rushed off their feet for most of the day, time to sit down and actually listen to patients is at a premium. Every doctor knows that our primary focus has to be on the most important aspects of the history and clinical

Expediting the physician credentialing process

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

It’s 2015 and there are many areas of healthcare that seem to lag way behind the rest of the world. One such area is in the realm of physician credentialing, which can take several months or longer in most hospitals (the ones I’ve worked in have all averaged 3-4 months at the minimum, and that’s

How healthcare IT can produce lower quality robotic records

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Despite the well-known rollout problems for hospitals and clinics across the nation, there are many palpable and welcome advantages to using Electronic Health Records. Chief among these are the ability to access the chart from anywhere, rapidly search for information needed, and reducing the centuries-old problem of illegible doctors’ handwriting! But with the good comes

What the Northeast’s snow preparedness can teach hospitals in winter

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Significant snow in New England every winter is about as certain as sun in Florida every summer. When I moved to the USA from the south of (old) England to do my medical residency in Maryland, my first few years living in the United States were relatively snow-free. But when I started my first job

The very palpable doctor shortage and how to help solve it

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

The nationwide shortage of physicians is a very real crisis across all 50 states, causing a huge strain at all levels of healthcare. Hospitals and clinics are struggling to hire, current physicians are overworked, and ultimately patients are having to wait longer. There are number of reasons why this has happened, but one thing’s for

The great things about patient-centered care in America

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

As part of the increasing push for healthcare quality improvement, a lot of energy is being focused on improving our communication with patients and making sure that patient-centered care is more than just a buzz phrase. Gone are the days when the doctor-patient interaction was a wholly paternalistic one, where the doctor’s word was taken as final

3 things all patients should do when discharged from hospital

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

The world of healthcare has made tremendous progress in the last several years in raising the quality and safety of clinical medicine. Yet despite this, the discharge process (when patients are discharged from hospital) is still fraught with potential pitfalls and opportunities for things to “slip through the net”. If you ask most patients who

A New Year’s Wish List for Hospitals

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Happy 2015! Healthcare in the United States continues to change faster than any of us can keep pace with and this shows no signs of slowing down. Having written a lot in 2014 on a variety of different topics, I wanted to focus on my own 5 wishes for hospital care this New Year. A

Keep Calm and Carry On: A very British response to Ebola

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

As 2014 draws to a close, one of the biggest and most followed stories of the year was the devastating Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The possibility of this outbreak spreading to the United States generated widespread concern and panic, and dominated cable news networks (across the spectrum, left and right-wing, no names mentioned) for

If you spend more than 80% of your day on the computer, you are no longer a doctor or nurse

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

The use of healthcare information technology has increased exponentially over the last five years, and as a frontline physician I have seen this change at close quarters. In most of the hospitals I’ve worked in up and down the East coast, it’s been interesting to observe this transformation. The process has usually started with nurses