Taking patient engagement to the next level in hospital care

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Improving “patient engagement” is a subject that’s being talked about in hospital boardrooms across the country. It’s become the in-fashion political buzz phrase. Certainly sounds very well and good, but what exactly does it mean? Likely different things to different people depending on what angle they approach it—all the way from a care assistant up

5 ways that healthcare IT must get better

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Yesterday I had the honor of speaking at a large event in Cambridge, Massachusetts, about how healthcare information technology needs to better integrate itself with the realities of frontline medicine, while also enabling doctors and nurses to spend maximum time with patients. The audience was filled with young and enthusiastic people—clinicians, IT professionals and entrepreneurs.

The great about US healthcare

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Anyone from outer space reading the news and watching TV would think that the USA has some of the worst healthcare possible. The negativity appears to be pervasive. Controversy over this, outrage over that. Whether it’s inadequate health outcomes, policy debate, or scandals with patient care—the stories and discussion abound. As someone who grew up

What my recent Madrid taxi ride taught me about the human side of good customer service

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Last week I took a trip to Spain and visited Madrid and Barcelona. For anyone who’s never visited this part of the world before, I’d highly recommend it. Beautiful sites and a very definite authentic culture. Upon our arrival to Madrid airport we caught a taxi to the city center. We were greeted by a

Oh, what to do about that background hospital beeping?!

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

You enter a patient’s room, begin a conversation, and then hear it. It may be from your patient’s machine, or the next bed; from the intravenous infusion or the telemetry monitor. “Beep, beep, beep!” What do you do? Do you: A. Look into the situation yourself and work out what’s wrong? B. Try to silence

Where doctors shouldn’t go the same way that pilots have

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

When I was a boy, my dream was to become an airline pilot. The job seemed glamorous and exciting, and appeared to be held in high regard by all the people around me. I actually used to have a bit of an obsession with airplanes, and living so close to Heathrow Airport, had plenty of

What veterinary medicine can teach human healthcare

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

Over the last few years I’ve had numerous encounters with vets and vet hospitals. Domino, the dog that we had since I was in medical school, was sadly very sick. He was a Jack Russell-Corgi cross, black and white, with the loveliest sweetest nature. He lived till almost 13 years old, bringing an immense amount

Patient satisfaction: when a well-intentioned authoritative “no” is better than an insincere “yes”

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

  The above title may sound rather controversial at a time when patient satisfaction and improving the healthcare experience is a hot topic around every hospital administration table. It’s something that I’ve thought and written a lot about and also personally feel very strongly about, because nothing short of total commitment to our patients is

Hospital doctors and healthcare-associated infections: dressing well and keeping our white coats until the evidence tells us otherwise

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

The problem of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and the morbidity that they cause is gaining more media attention with each passing week. The numbers are mind-boggling: according to the CDC over 700,000 HAIs occur nationwide in acute care hospitals, affecting almost 5 percent of all hospitalized patients1. In addition to the costs in human suffering, there’s

The things we learn from listening to our patients

By Suneel Dhand | Blog

                          It is one of the first things we learn in medical school, repeated to us over and over again by our clinical teachers: Listen to your patient. Yet in everyday medicine, this seemingly simple thing to do often proves elusive. In fact,